Jump to content


Photo

Merida Utilities


  • Please log in to reply
32 replies to this topic

#1 Yucatan4Me

Yucatan4Me

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts

Posted 10 March 2018 - 10:58 PM

1. Does most of Merida have city water?  I occasionally see a home with a well listed as the water source -- no thank you to a well, been there, done that. 

 

2.  City sewer?  Again, I occasionally see septic as the source of waste disposal.  No thank you to that, been there done that.

 

3.  Is the city primarily Propane, or natural gas?  No matter, but it looks like there are large propane tanks on top of the buildings in the main shopping areas?  Are they propane tanks?

 

4.  How often does the electric go out?  Does anyone have an auto switch with a propane/gas powered generator as back up?

 

Thanks in advance!  You folks are wonderful and I'm looking forward to visiting and living in Merida. 


What draws me in is that a trip is a leap in the dark. It's like a metaphor for life. You set off from home, and in the classic travel book, you go to an unknown place. You discover a different world, and you discover yourself. Paul Theroux




#2 bk85

bk85

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 162 posts

Posted 10 March 2018 - 11:13 PM

2.  City sewer?  Again, I occasionally see septic as the source of waste disposal.  No thank you to that, been there done that.

 

3.  Is the city primarily Propane, or natural gas?  No matter, but it looks like there are large propane tanks on top of the buildings in the main shopping areas?  Are they propane tanks?

 


I believe all of Centro is septic.

All of yucatan is propane. I don't think there is any natural gas system in the Yucatan.



#3 ChuckD

ChuckD

    Trivia Hall of Famer

  • Supporters
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,151 posts

Posted 11 March 2018 - 07:10 AM

I think there is only one colonia that has a sewer system. The rest of the city, and the state, are on individual septic systems.

The city has a municipal water system. A well is necessary if you have a pool. Outside of Merida the water flow is not always reliable so a well is a good idea for a backup.

OASIS DEL MAR VACATION RENTALS
https://www.homeaway...-rental/p212447 Progreso
 


#4 bk85

bk85

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 162 posts

Posted 11 March 2018 - 09:58 AM

I think there is only one colonia that has a sewer system. The rest of the city, and the state, are on individual septic systems.

What colonia is that?

 



#5 lencho

lencho

    Expert

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 11 March 2018 - 11:38 AM

All of yucatan is propane.


-------

I understand it's actually butane, or some similar mixture of LPG. For most intents and purposes it's the same, unless you fill up your tanks in Yucatán and go to Alaska (propane has a lower temperature of vaporization).

#6 Yucatan4Me

Yucatan4Me

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts

Posted 11 March 2018 - 11:44 AM

2.  City sewer?  Again, I occasionally see septic as the source of waste disposal.  No thank you to that, been there done that.

 

3.  Is the city primarily Propane, or natural gas?  No matter, but it looks like there are large propane tanks on top of the buildings in the main shopping areas?  Are they propane tanks?

 


I believe all of Centro is septic.

All of yucatan is propane. I don't think there is any natural gas system in the Yucatan.

 

Thank you so much for the information!  Chuck can probably answer the city sewer question, but I'm fairly certain I saw a listing that stated city sewer???  That doesn't mean anything, a lot can get lost in the translation.  It could have been nothing more than a community septic, and when the HOA goes debunk the community must take care of it.

 

In the states, each state has one designated state university funded by the Federal Government; and each county within the state has an "Extension Office" (obviously, an extension of the state university). If I want to know what kind of grass I should grow in my climate, they can tell me.  What nutrients do the soil need to grow a vegetable garden?  Want "4H" activities for your children?  The Federally funded "Extension" is YOUR office and info is free. The University and Extension Office oversee natural resources within your area (commodities that keep us alive).   I (any citizen) can utilize the information they've compiled about ground water supplies.  They know, down to the square foot, where the underground water is.  They can tell me exactly where to drill my well, how deep I need to drill, what types of soil, rock, etc. I will hit while drilling, how "hard" the water will be, or if it is feasible to drill a well at all.  They will supply information on the pollutants that may be present (I will save my cynicism about the accuracy of that info) . 

 

Speaking from personal experience well water is a PITA.  But, knowledge is power, so I'm wondering, if everyone has well water what information is available (nauseating to think about it but, how close is your neighbors leaking septic to your well?) .  By now, you get my drift and I've only scratched the surface (pun intended). The power goes out, no pump, no water.  Low water supply (not enough rain fall, lake running dry), you haul water.  Haul water for a few winters -- a water wagon on ice is like the tail wagging the dog!  Pucker up and hang on :o Now you need to drain the water out of the wagon and into the ground before the pipes freeze shut!  Lousy well with low seasonal water levels, you need underground holding tanks for water... On and on and on and on.  I would go without electricity before I would go without water (think about using the toilet for a few days without water), so naturally water supply is a huge concern, and a potential "deal breaker", no 2 ways about it.  I'm too darned old to repeat those experiences.  Water/well information is something I MUST have.  Do the "authorities" require a well test when the home is sold (I suspect they don't)?  Do they require a septic inspection?  Termite?


What draws me in is that a trip is a leap in the dark. It's like a metaphor for life. You set off from home, and in the classic travel book, you go to an unknown place. You discover a different world, and you discover yourself. Paul Theroux


#7 ChuckD

ChuckD

    Trivia Hall of Famer

  • Supporters
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,151 posts

Posted 11 March 2018 - 12:11 PM

Basically everything you know about what’s done in the US is irrelevant here. If you keep finding yourself comparing Mexico to home, it’s unlikely that you will enjoy living here.

No one I know drinks the city water. There are hundreds of bottled water delivery services.

There are no “authorities” that care about your well water, your septic or terminates.

M disco put many responsibilities on the people and doesn’t over regulate (although that is changing in some areas).

As for buying a house, it’s 100% buyer beware.

OASIS DEL MAR VACATION RENTALS
https://www.homeaway...-rental/p212447 Progreso
 


#8 Yucatan4Me

Yucatan4Me

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts

Posted 11 March 2018 - 01:04 PM

Basically everything you know about what’s done in the US is irrelevant here. If you keep finding yourself comparing Mexico to home, it’s unlikely that you will enjoy living here.

No one I know drinks the city water. There are hundreds of bottled water delivery services.

There are no “authorities” that care about your well water, your septic or terminates.

M disco put many responsibilities on the people and doesn’t over regulate (although that is changing in some areas).

As for buying a house, it’s 100% buyer beware.

Chuck, you and I have very different views about water.  This isn't an "emotional" topic of consideration, nor is it US vs Mexico.  I don't mind drinking bottled water; I do that now (which isn't bullet proof either; I know how they "clean" their filtration systems).  I think you missed my entire point about wells vs city water.  I had a well, it was originally pumped by wind!  I had a cistern with a sophisticated filtration system.  Been there, done that!  There is a big difference between modern amenities and drinking bottled water; not the least of which is knowledge about well water, and septic systems.  Just because it's underground and you can't see it doesn't mean it is not an intricate, life sustaining part of your home. I would encourage everyone to think about that before they buy a home in ANY country; consider it a priority.

 

With a back-up generator you can still get well water so that doesn't bother me.  But, personally, I do not wish to wash my hands, clothes, dishes, or bathe in water that is contaminated by the neighbors septic tank.  Something about washing in feces... Hmmm?  Welcome to the real world!  Water is a very important consideration in ANY set of circumstances.  Thus, my questions.  I suspect there is some "authority" in Mexico tracking natural, life sustaining resources like water.  I also suspect there are labs that test water for various things, like... well you know where I'm going.  Using your brain and the knowledge you have by "comparing" is science, isn't it?  I'm fairly certain there are extremely intelligent people in Mexico who have the knowledge I need to make an "informed" decision.  Finding them is where I'm at.  I understand there is an English Library in Merida; that may be a good place to start.


What draws me in is that a trip is a leap in the dark. It's like a metaphor for life. You set off from home, and in the classic travel book, you go to an unknown place. You discover a different world, and you discover yourself. Paul Theroux


#9 lencho

lencho

    Expert

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 11 March 2018 - 01:33 PM

I suspect there is some "authority" in Mexico tracking natural, life sustaining resources like water.  I also suspect there are labs that test water for various things, like... well you know where I'm going.  Using your brain and the knowledge you have by "comparing" is science, isn't it?  I'm fairly certain there are extremely intelligent people in Mexico who have the knowledge I need to make an "informed" decision.

 
 
 
With all due respect, based on your comments, I think Mexico may be more different from the U.S. than you believe.  I strongly suggest you rent and not consider buying property till you've experienced it for a year.



#10 Yucatan4Me

Yucatan4Me

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts

Posted 11 March 2018 - 02:42 PM

 
With all due respect, based on your comments, I think Mexico may be more different from the U.S. than you believe.  I strongly suggest you rent and not consider buying property till you've experienced it for a year.

Who knew wanting information about the water that comes out of the pipes in my home would stir such opinions?  Life, it's funny and unexpected things happen.  Are the people who live, work, and move to Mexico unconcerned about their water?  I think not, but hey, that's just a WAG.  With all due respect; I'm wondering, have you underestimated the Mexican authorities, and the number of Universities who educate people about natural resources?  Will American's trust the doctors educated and trained in Mexican Universities and let them perform surgery on them, but won't entertain the thought there is a wealth of knowledgeable, educated people who study natural resources?  The logic escapes me.  I may be more of an advocate of Mexico, their culture, and their people than many.

 

I should add:  once you know what you are faced with, there are typically very smart people who can help you, give you solutions, explain the best way to solve the problem.  If you never ask, never know, maybe that is easier in the short term, but problematic in the long run.


What draws me in is that a trip is a leap in the dark. It's like a metaphor for life. You set off from home, and in the classic travel book, you go to an unknown place. You discover a different world, and you discover yourself. Paul Theroux


#11 Yucatan4Me

Yucatan4Me

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts

Posted 11 March 2018 - 03:17 PM

I think there is only one colonia that has a sewer system. The rest of the city, and the state, are on individual septic systems.

The city has a municipal water system. A well is necessary if you have a pool. Outside of Merida the water flow is not always reliable so a well is a good idea for a backup.

Thank you for the information!  Very much appreciated.


What draws me in is that a trip is a leap in the dark. It's like a metaphor for life. You set off from home, and in the classic travel book, you go to an unknown place. You discover a different world, and you discover yourself. Paul Theroux


#12 stormy

stormy

    Super Advanced

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 356 posts

Posted 11 March 2018 - 04:21 PM

Yucatan is a big limestone self, there is very little surface water. The rain just seeps in. 20,000 years ago, the sea level was much lower than today, caves formed in said limestone as the rain seeped down to a much lower water table, dissolving limestone as it seeped. The water under Merida moves around better than most places because of all the voids. If your well is in good solid limestone, it should be potable, deeper wells are better. Drilling a deeper well  is a gamble, you might drill into a void but then you might get fine water. The shallow aquifer is pretty contaminated, is my understanding.   Getting up toward the coast, the fresh water sits on top of saltwater, another issue.  All of these problems can be cured with money-how much is the luck of the draw. 



#13 lencho

lencho

    Expert

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 532 posts

Posted 11 March 2018 - 04:25 PM

With all due respect; I'm wondering, have you underestimated the Mexican authorities, and the number of Universities who educate people about natural resources?

---------------------------

Maybe. I was employed in a Mexican Government biological research center for 17 years, among multi-degreed investigators who work with those natural resources you mention, and have interacted more than most with Mexican academics and authorities both in official and "civilian" capacity.

Experience has given me certain ideas about how things work in Mexico, but your mileage may vary.

#14 Dave_in_Ont

Dave_in_Ont

    Veteran

  • Supporters
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,552 posts

Posted 11 March 2018 - 07:39 PM

I have waited a while before weighing in on this thread. I agree that there are a ton of highly educated and idealistic people in Mexico. However, if the basic infrastructure is antiquated and there isn't the money or the practical/realistic possibility of upgrading then it is very difficult to provide water and sewage services that folks are used to in Canada or the USA. You have to understand that Merida is a very old city and the streets are narrow, some, if not most water mains might run under streets, sidewalks and maybe even under actual houses. From what I have read, the water in Merida and even Progreso IS tested regularly at source. But the water leaving the main supply travels through pipes that are very old and what ends up at the house might not be quite as clean as when it started out.

 

We live at the beach and if we had to rely on municipal water we would not be flushing toilets, washing dishes nor taking showers. A well is a necessity here. Yes, a well involves a pump and a pump requires electricity...but if the plumbing system is set up correctly, the tinaca on the roof will supply gravity fed water without electricity.

 

All the folks offering advice to Yucatan4me are doing so based on their own real life experience here in the Yucatan. They know what they are talking about and I agree with all of them. This is NOT Canada nor USA, it is Mexico. You will only come to accept that fact once you have lived here for a few years. 

 

I think everyone who moves here believes, for the first few months, that they can do something to change how things work. It doesn't happen and we all eventually accept that fact and just go with the flow.

 

Come on down, rent for a year or two, see how you fit into Mexico, not how you can make Mexico fit into your way of thinking (cause that ain't never gonna happen) and then go from there.

 

This area of Mexico is a wonderful place to live but it isn't for everyone.

 

(Just as a caveat..We lived "out in the boonies" in Canada before retiring. We had a well as a source of water and a septic tank/weeping bed for sewage for 40 years. We never found that to be a problem. Also had a 200 gallon propane tank for heat, cooking, hot water and clothes dryer. Maybe that's why we get along with "the Mexican way" as easily as we do? LOL)


Driving Through Mexico


Eleven years snow free, and still counting on my luck!!!


#15 jiminchelem

jiminchelem

    Expert

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 589 posts

Posted 12 March 2018 - 02:27 AM

I agree with Chuck, except.... I know people (even expats) that drink the city water.  I personally do not.

You can however buy test kits, most people here with purification systems for their well water have and use them.

I borrowed one once and my well water (in Chelem) failed horribly so we only drink, and cook with, bottled water!

(We also do not have city water, which should be renamed, STN (sometimes there's no) city water.)



#16 Yucatan4Me

Yucatan4Me

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts

Posted 12 March 2018 - 04:18 AM

I have waited a while before weighing in on this thread. I agree that there are a ton of highly educated and idealistic people in Mexico. However, if the basic infrastructure is antiquated and there isn't the money or the practical/realistic possibility of upgrading then it is very difficult to provide water and sewage services that folks are used to in Canada or the USA. You have to understand that Merida is a very old city and the streets are narrow, some, if not most water mains might run under streets, sidewalks and maybe even under actual houses. From what I have read, the water in Merida and even Progreso IS tested regularly at source. But the water leaving the main supply travels through pipes that are very old and what ends up at the house might not be quite as clean as when it started out.

 

We live at the beach and if we had to rely on municipal water we would not be flushing toilets, washing dishes nor taking showers. A well is a necessity here. Yes, a well involves a pump and a pump requires electricity...but if the plumbing system is set up correctly, the tinaca on the roof will supply gravity fed water without electricity.

 

All the folks offering advice to Yucatan4me are doing so based on their own real life experience here in the Yucatan. They know what they are talking about and I agree with all of them. This is NOT Canada nor USA, it is Mexico. You will only come to accept that fact once you have lived here for a few years. 

 

I think everyone who moves here believes, for the first few months, that they can do something to change how things work. It doesn't happen and we all eventually accept that fact and just go with the flow.

 

Come on down, rent for a year or two, see how you fit into Mexico, not how you can make Mexico fit into your way of thinking (cause that ain't never gonna happen) and then go from there.

 

This area of Mexico is a wonderful place to live but it isn't for everyone.

 

(Just as a caveat..We lived "out in the boonies" in Canada before retiring. We had a well as a source of water and a septic tank/weeping bed for sewage for 40 years. We never found that to be a problem. Also had a 200 gallon propane tank for heat, cooking, hot water and clothes dryer. Maybe that's why we get along with "the Mexican way" as easily as we do? LOL)

 

I agree as well, Mexico is not the US or Canada;  I checked and it's geographical location is 20.98 latitude and -89.62 longitude (laughing because a smart a$$ answer to a smart a$$ statement is funny :P Haha, j/k.  I'm glad you sat back and waited because you are correct about the very limited information you gave. Below is a more comprehensive and scientific answer to my question. I should have just researched it and ran with it.  I'm not sure the beating I'm taking was worth the effort :unsure:   I had hoped someone here had already did this and knew specific people/labs/universities, and professionals to contact.  I can research that as well and I will be happy to share that with you when I do.

 

Mexico is concerned (very intelligent people just as I had assumed) and does monitor their resources with very detailed scientific accuracy.The people who live in Merida may be interested in the "real life" science conducted on their water supply.  Please see Applied Geography.  

 

Fascinating that this buyer beware business which is constantly being stated is anything but caveat emptor in this specific conversation.  This buyer is making herself aware.  I am adhering to the due diligence required, and as I do I'm told Mexico isn't for me because I am being diligent -- a circular train of thought.  Huh???  What???   :wacko:  I understand why this is an emotional topic for some people living ANYWHERE in the world, including the US; water is very important and the unknown can be very scary; it's uncharted territory for most. I'm fortunate to have some working knowledge on the matter.  Knowledge is power and without it I would be afraid -- it's not the answers I fear, it's never asking the question that I fear.

 

The study in Applied Geology primarily focuses on nitrates and they explain why they focus on nitrates.  Furthermore, it details the source of the water supply in Merida (no one here seemed to know where their well water originated), as well as the locations of the wells.  "Nitrate in water is undetectable without testing because it is colorless, odorless, and tasteless. A water test for nitrate is highly recommended for households with infants, pregnant women, nursing mothers, or elderly people."

 

The very knowledgeable and very informed "experts" state: "If excessive nitrate-nitrogen is present in your water supply, you have two basic choices: obtain an alternate water supply or use some type of treatment to remove the nitrate-nitrogen.  The need for an alternate water supply or nitrate-nitrogen removal should be established before making an investment in treatment equipment or an alternate supply.  Base the decision on a nitrate analysis by a reputable laboratory, [emphasis added] and after consulting with your physician to help you evaluate the level of risk or other professionals."

 

Without digging deeper into "what you should test for" and "how to interpret the results" most experts would recommend knowing the levels of the various contaminates; easy peasy, fill a cup with tap water and send it off to the lab.  Once you know what you're dealing with you can make an informed decision (as noted above).  As many on this forum have stated over and over; caveat emptor.  As I see it I have 2 options; test and treat the water according to the results or just ignore it and pretend it doesn't exist.

 

In the end, I stand by my decision to know about the water in my home despite the hazing I got here with several people posting "Mexico may not be the place for me". I assume there are others of all Nationalities living in Merida who have "been there, done that".  It's a part of buying a home -- and so is a septic inspections BTW.  This may be an entirely new side of Mexico that some have never experienced :)  I don't need rules and regs to tell me what I should or shouldn't do when it comes to the water in my home.  I'm capable of doing some things without the government telling me  :D

 

BTW, I have traveled and lived around the globe.  Like you, I had a farm with a well and propane -- 20 miles to the nearest stop light.  I've survived without electric and water in below zero weather.  I could scream at the top of my lungs and no one would hear me.  So, I may have a tiny bit of knowledge about what it takes to survive, alone, with zero help from a man :)  hehehe  But hey, I'm sure Mexico is much worse than that... sorry for the sarcasm.  I think most are trying to be helpful in a somewhat condescending macho manner.


What draws me in is that a trip is a leap in the dark. It's like a metaphor for life. You set off from home, and in the classic travel book, you go to an unknown place. You discover a different world, and you discover yourself. Paul Theroux


#17 Yucatan4Me

Yucatan4Me

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts

Posted 12 March 2018 - 05:23 AM

---------------------------

Maybe. I was employed in a Mexican Government biological research center for 17 years, among multi-degreed investigators who work with those natural resources you mention, and have interacted more than most with Mexican academics and authorities both in official and "civilian" capacity.

Experience has given me certain ideas about how things work in Mexico, but your mileage may vary.

And, just maybe (definitely) weren't. hahaha.  I'm going to be polite and not say anything.  On the internet we can be anything we can think up in our heads; getting others to believe it is the hard part ;)


What draws me in is that a trip is a leap in the dark. It's like a metaphor for life. You set off from home, and in the classic travel book, you go to an unknown place. You discover a different world, and you discover yourself. Paul Theroux


#18 Yucatan4Me

Yucatan4Me

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts

Posted 12 March 2018 - 05:34 AM

I agree with Chuck, except.... I know people (even expats) that drink the city water.  I personally do not.

You can however buy test kits, most people here with purification systems for their well water have and use them.

I borrowed one once and my well water (in Chelem) failed horribly so we only drink, and cook with, bottled water!

(We also do not have city water, which should be renamed, STN (sometimes there's no) city water.)

Thank you!  I will probably do a septic test and a water test when I buy -- too bad so sad if the seller doesn't like it.  Can you tell me why you sometimes don't have water?  Is it a seasonal problem due to low water table, or is it an electric problem and the water can't be pumped?  My concern is mostly related to my elderly father.  In the vast majority of situations a water softener with reverse osmosis at the sink should work fine in Merida. I maintain my cars, my furnace, etc., so maintaining my water systems and filters isn't any different, only more important.  I posted elsewhere the Merida water studies and there is a dramatic difference in water quality throughout Merida (sadly in the main part of the city -- ugh, the beautiful colonial homes).  Just as in the US, the water quality can vary from one home to the next for a variety of reasons).  Water quality, and life in general carries no guarantees.  I'm very hesitant to talk about the varying quality of bottled water because there are too many people here who are way too emotional about this topic. Everything in life carries a certain amount of risk.  I'm not a germaphobe; the 30 second rule is okay with me if it's something I'm really hungry for, hehehe.


What draws me in is that a trip is a leap in the dark. It's like a metaphor for life. You set off from home, and in the classic travel book, you go to an unknown place. You discover a different world, and you discover yourself. Paul Theroux


#19 judy

judy

    Expert

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 943 posts

Posted 12 March 2018 - 05:53 AM

Thank you so much for that valuable information.

My husband and I have lived here for 9 years and must have been living in a bubble. We have a cistern here in Progreso, which fills from city water. We shower, brush our teeth, and wash clothes with that water, never thinking about all the things you have now brought to light.

From now on when I turn the tap on in the kitchen, I will be mindful of such horrid germs and what not (big ass spider died in the cistern years ago and is now calcified at the bottom) that are pouring from that seemingly safe tap.

I used to ( I'll call it BWI, before water info) get up in the morning and walk outside and say "hello Mexico, I love you", but now, being so informed, I will stay mindful and say "hello Mexico, I love you, but please do not kill me today when I brush my teeth".



#20 Yucatan4Me

Yucatan4Me

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts

Posted 12 March 2018 - 06:26 AM

Yucatan is a big limestone self, there is very little surface water. The rain just seeps in. 20,000 years ago, the sea level was much lower than today, caves formed in said limestone as the rain seeped down to a much lower water table, dissolving limestone as it seeped. The water under Merida moves around better than most places because of all the voids. If your well is in good solid limestone, it should be potable, deeper wells are better. Drilling a deeper well  is a gamble, you might drill into a void but then you might get fine water. The shallow aquifer is pretty contaminated, is my understanding.   Getting up toward the coast, the fresh water sits on top of saltwater, another issue.  All of these problems can be cured with money-how much is the luck of the draw. 

Thank you so much!  You are very informed and I have verified this information. You are a smart guy for sure.  I appreciate it.  What I am most concerned about is my elderly father with diabetes and the open wounds he seems to get on a regular basis.  Bacteria in the water could literally kill him.  I use a water softener in my own home.  I don't think people realize a US doctor can and will prescribe water treatment systems and reverse osmosis systems to people with health problems; it's a tax deduction under health care expenses. The wells in Mexico are rather shallow, and in areas where many poor people live the waste water is a concern; so are hog farms, or chicken ranches.  Of agriculture and animal waste isn't limited to the water in Mexico, it's a huge concern in the US.  Ironically, everyone is telling me how Mexico is so much different in terms of water quality, but what they fail to realize is there are countries that warn anyone who travels to the US not to drink our water.  If you are young and healthy you may be fine.  If you are sick, an infant, pregnant or elderly you are at risk.


What draws me in is that a trip is a leap in the dark. It's like a metaphor for life. You set off from home, and in the classic travel book, you go to an unknown place. You discover a different world, and you discover yourself. Paul Theroux





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users