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Who can Drive


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#1 LegalBlonde

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Posted 16 July 2010 - 09:51 AM

Our grown children are coming down soon and I wondered if they can drive our car, which has Canadian plates. We have FM2s and they will be on tourist visas. I know there used to be something on Yolisto re this but can't find it. I seem to remember that they can't drive but just wanted to see if anyone knows for sure.



#2 Theresa

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Posted 16 July 2010 - 12:57 PM

Here is what the Aduana says

"Los vehículos podrán ser conducidos en territorio nacional por el importador, su cónyuge (esposos), sus ascendientes (padres), descendientes (hijos) o hermanos, aun cuando éstos no sean extranjeros, por un extranjero que tenga alguna de las calidades migratorias ya señaladas, o por un nacional, siempre que en este último caso, viaje a bordo del mismo cualquiera de las personas autorizadas para conducir el vehículo."

so yes they can drive it....
Theresa




#3 lizard

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Posted 16 July 2010 - 01:59 PM

You may want to check with your insurance to make sure they are covered if they do drive your car. I think they should be but who knows better safe than sorry

#4 calliope

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Posted 29 August 2010 - 09:02 PM

Good point, Lizard.  Also, does anyone know where I could find information on whether the term "spouse" in the following article also applies to common-law spouses?  TIA :)

Customs Law Temporary Vehicle Importation Regulations

ARTICLE 106.

Temporary importation is understood as the entry of merchandise intothe country, which will remain in it for a limited period of time andfor a specific purpose, so long as it is returned abroad in the samecondition. The former applies for the following term:

PART IV. For the term of his or her migratory status, includingextensions, in the following cases: Vehicles owned by tourists,visitors, local visitors and distinguished visitors, students, andimmigrants who are tenants, whenever said vehicles are their own,excepting tourists and local visitors. When the vehicles are not theirown, requirements established within the regulations must be met. Suchvehicles may be driven within the national territory by a foreigner–the importer holding one of the migratory status referred to in thisparagraph, by his or hers spouse, parents or descendants, even when thelatter are not foreigners: and by a Mexican as long as one of thepersons authorized to drive the vehicle travels with him or her in thecar.
Vehicles referred to in this section must meet the requirements pointed out in the regulations.

#5 Dave_in_Ont

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Posted 30 August 2010 - 04:35 PM

Calliope...Good question. Shirley and I have survived a 30 year common-law relationship. We each have an FM3. All our documentation shows that we are "married" (Joint bank accounts etc. for FM3 purposes) We have never been questioned about our relationship, including, being able for either of us to drive our vehicle in Mexico.

 

I'll be interested in hearing any comments.

 

As an aside, a couple of weeks ago we, Shirley 65 and I 66, headed to the USA in our car and handed our passports to the US customs officer. Since our last names are different he asked. "How do the two of you know each other?" Not wanting to sound like a complete jerk, I just said "We met 30 years ago and have been living in sin ever since." He laughed and told us to have a nice trip.

 

If you think about it..the Mexican custom, as far as legal names is concerned, is very confusing to we gringos. I imagine it is just as confusing to locals when it comes to our legal names.

 

I would be much more concerned about the insurance coverage.



#6

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Posted 30 August 2010 - 05:25 PM

I wonder if you could just say married, and that would be the end of it.

Mike and I are legally married (21 years this November), but we have different last names.  When looking at our documentation, they sometimes ask what our relationship is, as we always go through Immigration together, Customs together, and we just say Married and they wave us on. Don't know what we'd do if they ever asked us to prove it, as there is a marriage license... in a drawer, somewhere, in the States.

Actually, we only do one Immigration form for the both of us, using Mike as head of household, and submit this with both our passports together. Never had a problem.



#7 LegalBlonde

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Posted 31 August 2010 - 09:06 AM

If you ever decide to go to IMSS you will definitely need your marriage certificate. In fact you will need a certified Spanish translation of it and your birth certificates. If you are not married, I understand you will be on the file as a "concubine"

#8 Dave_in_Ont

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Posted 31 August 2010 - 02:48 PM

LOL Nan...."Concubine" . How Biblical!!!!!! Shirl will love that. 

#9 LegalBlonde

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Posted 31 August 2010 - 06:24 PM

Got that from Larry Baker. Check out his blog about IMSS

#10 YolistoKhaki

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Posted 31 August 2010 - 08:04 PM

Larry always has great information and gets in plenty of "zingers" - the concubine event was in Day 5 here.

#11 Dave_in_Ont

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Posted 31 August 2010 - 08:20 PM

Khaki...I just read that link!!!

 

Very humorous!!






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