Jump to content


Earth (Sand) Bag House For Yucatan


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1

  • Guests

Posted 05 May 2011 - 10:13 AM

Not to start the whole container-green-living-recycling-sustainable-housing thing again, but I find this fascinating:

http://earthbagbuilding.wordpress.com/

Why couldn't people in Yucatan build their houses of sand, using the big hole left from digging as the family pool?

I saw an average cost somewhere of $10/ft. Obviously, some accommodations would need to be made for framework, roofing, etc. But how adorable would a cute little plastered bag house be with Tejas roof and metal or hardwood framework?

I'm wearing my asbestos dress today, so flame on, smart people. I'd like to hear what others think. I haven't had time to read this guy's whole blog, but there's some reference therein to building a bag house in Yucatan.



#2 lizard

lizard

    Lizard

  • Supporters
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,536 posts

Posted 05 May 2011 - 12:01 PM

Not to start the whole container-green-living-recycling-sustainable-housing thing again, but I find this fascinating:

http://earthbagbuilding.wordpress.com/

Why couldn't people in Yucatan build their houses of sand, using the big hole left from digging as the family pool?

I saw an average cost somewhere of $10/ft. Obviously, some accommodations would need to be made for framework, roofing, etc. But how adorable would a cute little plastered bag house be with Tejas roof and metal or hardwood framework?

I'm wearing my asbestos dress today, so flame on, smart people. I'd like to hear what others think. I haven't had time to read this guy's whole blog, but there's some reference therein to building a bag house in Yucatan.


We may not agree on politics but I find all these alternative housing materials and mae-shift solar water heaters, cookers .... facinating.
Must be the Sountern Engineer in me :P
BBQ Master for Lizard Joes AY AY AY!!!
www.lizardjoes.com
http://www.facebook.com/lizardjoes

#3 CoolChef

CoolChef

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts

Posted 05 May 2011 - 12:11 PM

Im all for sustainable housing, Im sure you know about the Earthship or the Cob Home or how about the Straw Bale Home. With all of these homes Heat would not not be a problem and they are really cheap to build. but the problem is most Countries do not allow them and getting permits would probably take a year or more.

Im not sure about Mexico but I would be interested to find out if they would allow them, I have my eye on some beachfront that only allows natural materials, water treatment plant (No septic),Alternative Energy (Solar and wind) and a maximum home size of 1300 square feet. I think the bag home or any of the others I listed would be a perfect candidate for this project. :)
Do vegetarians eat animal crackers?

#4 CoolChef

CoolChef

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts

Posted 05 May 2011 - 12:12 PM

We may not agree on politics but I find all these alternative housing materials and mae-shift solar water heaters, cookers .... facinating.
Must be the Sountern Engineer in me :P



Have you tried any of the Solar heater Plans?
Do vegetarians eat animal crackers?

#5 lizard

lizard

    Lizard

  • Supporters
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,536 posts

Posted 05 May 2011 - 12:21 PM

Have you tried any of the Solar heater Plans?


No I haven't but I have been toying with the idea of adding blac tubes encased in glass boxes on the roof that could drain into the existing water heater. Our propane water heater is outside in direct sunlight and if I wait to shower around 3 PM the water is usually warm to hot without ever turning it on so I figure if I had more water heating on the roof to replace the hot water contents I should have plenty for our needs
BBQ Master for Lizard Joes AY AY AY!!!
www.lizardjoes.com
http://www.facebook.com/lizardjoes

#6 CoolChef

CoolChef

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts

Posted 05 May 2011 - 12:36 PM

Not to start the whole container-green-living-recycling-sustainable-housing thing again, but I find this fascinating:

http://earthbagbuilding.wordpress.com/

Why couldn't people in Yucatan build their houses of sand, using the big hole left from digging as the family pool?

I saw an average cost somewhere of $10/ft. Obviously, some accommodations would need to be made for framework, roofing, etc. But how adorable would a cute little plastered bag house be with Tejas roof and metal or hardwood framework?

I'm wearing my asbestos dress today, so flame on, smart people. I'd like to hear what others think. I haven't had time to read this guy's whole blog, but there's some reference therein to building a bag house in Yucatan.


Lynette here is a better explanation and some plans Bag Homes

Lizard I would be Interested to see what you do, If you decide to do it .. Im available to help out! :)
Do vegetarians eat animal crackers?

#7

  • Guests

Posted 05 May 2011 - 12:58 PM

Chef, that's the piece I came across that discussed cost.

As for whether it would be approved in Yucatan, that would be an interesting question for any architects who drop by here. Given the state of some of the houses near the lagoon outside of Chixculub :( it seems a nice little plastered bag house would be preferable.

Lizard, west Texas would be ideal for many of the alternative building methods. I was enchanted by straw bale houses, which don't do well in very humid climates, until I came across the bag houses. (I think there's a tree hugging environmentalist lurking inside you, cupcake.)

Just bags. Wouldn't that be too cool? The Tejas roof we put over our upstairs room at the house in Chuburna was quite inexpensive. Rot/insect resistant hardwood with clay tile. We've screened the holes so it's bug proof. And it's darling to boot.

Oh lookie.... someone in Merida building a bag house:

"Q: I'm trying to build an earth bag dome here in Merida, Yucatan. The soil is pretty bare and mostly composed of limestone mother rock. There is an abundance of limestone dust that is not very expensive here and that I would like to use for bag filling, instead of the cement, lime, red earth, stone dust mix that my neighbours are using to build their earth dome house. My plan is for a 5 meter diameter dome. simple. Is their anything I could add to the limestone dust/gravel to stabilize it? A: My guess is that if you just add enough water to dampen the limestone dust and then tamp it well in the bags that it will pack into a rather solid block. You might try this and see. If it doesn't "set up" after it dries, then you will need to add some cement or perhaps clay to it. I think you are going to have to experiment with a variety of mixes to see what works"

Tons of Q&A about bag building:

http://www.greenhome...rthbag/fill.htm


Lots lots more links

http://www.earthbagb...les.htm#climate

#8

  • Guests

Posted 05 May 2011 - 01:34 PM

Actually I believe a stick house would be the most economical to make here.
However I've found/believe NOTHING is bug proof here! Except maybe plastic.
Not even cement, and the ants seem to like rusted rebar also.
How bout a house made totally of broken plastic chairs and tables,
there are definitely enough of them scattered around here.
And it would be a recycling plus.

pP

#9 whazzoo

whazzoo

    Genius naturally

  • Supporters
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,535 posts

Posted 05 May 2011 - 02:39 PM

No I haven't but I have been toying with the idea of adding blac tubes encased in glass boxes on the roof that could drain into the existing water heater. Our propane water heater is outside in direct sunlight and if I wait to shower around 3 PM the water is usually warm to hot without ever turning it on so I figure if I had more water heating on the roof to replace the hot water contents I should have plenty for our needs




Be careful, the water from a solar heater is going to be way hotter than you think it is.

Whazzoo


Aerocretos de Mexico, S. de R.L. de C.V.

General Contractors

999-273-0840

 www.aerocretosdemexico.com 

 

 


#10

  • Guests

Posted 05 May 2011 - 02:53 PM

Yes, it'll get hotter than 120 degrees.

#11

  • Guests

Posted 05 May 2011 - 02:57 PM

Our solar heater pops off and runs steaming water over the edge of the roof when it gets too hot. Have to cover it up when we're gone.

#12

  • Guests

Posted 05 May 2011 - 03:02 PM

Run it to the kitchen and cook with it!

#13 CoolChef

CoolChef

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts

Posted 05 May 2011 - 06:02 PM

Chef, that's the piece I came across that discussed cost.

As for whether it would be approved in Yucatan, that would be an interesting question for any architects who drop by here. Given the state of some of the houses near the lagoon outside of Chixculub :( it seems a nice little plastered bag house would be preferable.




Here is an email I got from him about the Home he built in Mexico

Hola Chef,

I never got any permits for the little bit of remodeling that I did in Mexico. If I had started with new construction, I probably would have. My understanding is that mostly the Mexican government is interested in keeping track of building projects so that they can be assessed and added to the tax roles. Except in some of the more urban areas, I doubt that they are much concerned about codes.

Kelly Hart

Interesting ... Im going to ask around.. You may be seeing a Bag Home on a Beach near you very soon! :D
Do vegetarians eat animal crackers?

#14 CasiYucateco

CasiYucateco

    Veteran

  • Moderators
  • 3,308 posts

Posted 05 May 2011 - 06:16 PM

We may not agree on politics but I find all these alternative housing materials and mae-shift solar water heaters, cookers .... facinating.
Must be the Sountern Engineer in me :P


I studied the earth bag buildings quite a bit when we owned some land in the countryside of Yucatan. The problem we found was that there simply wasn't enough "earth" available on site. Yes, we could have trucked in sand, cement, everything else, but by then, it wouldn't be a low-impact structure what with all the trucking, fuel, costs, etc.

The designs are great and the structures are self-supporting, but you do need the correct stable mix for packing in the bags, plus a coating of stucco for the outside. The insides were 'recommended' to be plastered in a sort of earth plaster. Again, there wasn't enough "earth."

In the beach areas, using sand and adding cement, it might work. Although... if the sand has lots of salt in it, I'm not sure what that would do to the stability of the cement. I do like the curved smooth appearances of the rooms and the designs very much. Maybe some day....
..........................
My grandfather used to be fascinated with all things solar. Up in the Midwest USA, he made solar ovens and baked bread, cooked beans, various things. It was in the 1970s when such things were really popular. He would have been in his 60s then. So they do work. The thing is learning to plan your day around the sun, the time that it takes, etc. And he was doing it for fun, not out of necessity.

Surely if solar ovens worked in the Midwest USA, they'd work in Yucatan as hot as the tropical sun is here. The basic design that worked the best, as I recall, was one with the foil lined box and the four flaps that were adjustable outside. He used to teach a course in wilderness survival and orientation that would end with the arrival at the solar oven, silently cooking away, for all to enjoy a good meal.
{ Banner Free since 1978 }

#15 lizard

lizard

    Lizard

  • Supporters
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,536 posts

Posted 05 May 2011 - 06:34 PM

Lizard, west Texas would be ideal for many of the alternative building methods. I was enchanted by straw bale houses, which don't do well in very humid climates, until I came across the bag houses. (I think there's a tree hugging environmentalist lurking inside you, cupcake.)


No I'm just a cheap bastard
BBQ Master for Lizard Joes AY AY AY!!!
www.lizardjoes.com
http://www.facebook.com/lizardjoes

#16

  • Guests

Posted 05 May 2011 - 09:05 PM

No I'm just a cheap bastard


me too, though i've hitched my wagon to a spendthrift.

Casi... somewhere in Yucatan and perhaps in Tabasco? Chiapas? as well, solar ovens are being distributed to women in exchange for a bag or two of recyclable plastics. They're simple affairs, silver-coated three-sided things that wrap around the pot and with a good day of sunshine, will apparently cook up a tasty meal. Wish I had the link, or a faster computer this evening.

I am like your kin. I find all this independent living stuff enchanting. My obsession started with finding a box full of old 1960s-70s Organic Gardening and Mother Earth magazines at a yard sale back in the late '80s. I was pretty active in Earth First! at the time, and living in the wild seemed enormously appealing, so composting toilets, chicken tractors, solar cookers, and rain barrels were necessary components of the dream. As it happens, I ended up settling for a little urban homestead, and my expectation of keeping goats and making cheese, having a couple of laying hens (and that chicken tractor!) fell by the wayside. Sigh. But I could totally do the self sufficient old hippie thing. Totally.

#17 lizard

lizard

    Lizard

  • Supporters
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,536 posts

Posted 06 May 2011 - 09:47 AM

me too, though i've hitched my wagon to a spendthrift.

Casi... somewhere in Yucatan and perhaps in Tabasco? Chiapas? as well, solar ovens are being distributed to women in exchange for a bag or two of recyclable plastics. They're simple affairs, silver-coated three-sided things that wrap around the pot and with a good day of sunshine, will apparently cook up a tasty meal. Wish I had the link, or a faster computer this evening.

I am like your kin. I find all this independent living stuff enchanting. My obsession started with finding a box full of old 1960s-70s Organic Gardening and Mother Earth magazines at a yard sale back in the late '80s. I was pretty active in Earth First! at the time, and living in the wild seemed enormously appealing, so composting toilets, chicken tractors, solar cookers, and rain barrels were necessary components of the dream. As it happens, I ended up settling for a little urban homestead, and my expectation of keeping goats and making cheese, having a couple of laying hens (and that chicken tractor!) fell by the wayside. Sigh. But I could totally do the self sufficient old hippie thing. Totally.


Mother Eath News is a great magazine. I was a subscriber for years until I gave up the idea of wondering off into the wilderness to be a self-sufficient hermit on 5 acres
BBQ Master for Lizard Joes AY AY AY!!!
www.lizardjoes.com
http://www.facebook.com/lizardjoes

#18 HenryVG

HenryVG

    Super Advanced

  • Supporters
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 420 posts

Posted 06 May 2011 - 09:50 PM

Lizard:

I've got one of these
http://solarcooking....com/wiki/CooKit
at our beach house and it works great, but *I* don't have the cooking skills to make it create a good meal.

Easy to make. I still think there has to be a way to make one out of water bottles and the inside surface of beer cans, but by the time I get enough cans emptied, I can never figure out how to do it.....

OK, I really just wanted to get that "other" topic off the front page.


#19 YolistoKhaki

YolistoKhaki

    Veteran

  • Administrators
  • 3,695 posts

Posted 07 May 2011 - 02:54 AM

I've got one of these
http://solarcooking....com/wiki/CooKit
at our beach house and it works great, but *I* don't have the cooking skills to make it create a good meal.


Think of it as a crock pot that cooks at about 250 degrees. They're really kinda cool to have because the food doesn't burn. If you want to bump it up to 400+ degrees, put it in the middle of a big truck tire with a sheet of glass over it. Cooking one-pot meals (gumbo, jambalaya, etouffee, roasts, casserole type things - "baked" potatoes, sweet potatoes, etc) are the way to go with this kind of cooking.

Lynette - re: a couple of chickens
I was in the grocery store earlier this week and found myself standing in front of the chickens side-by-side with the meat market manager. I looked at him and said "I've never seen a $7.00 chicken in my life!" He said, "Well now you have." I just laughed and told him that was HIS hallucination, not mine. ...and I left without chicken. I've got some rabbit cages with no residents at the moment and just might put a few chickens in them.

Did you see who's building an Earthbag house? Kelly and Rosana Hart (Mexico With Hart http://www.mexico-with-heart.com/ ) She's got a whole "how they did it and how much it cost" on the link from Lynette: http://www.greenhome...om/earthbag.htm

#20

  • Guests

Posted 07 May 2011 - 03:41 PM

that's very cool, yk. gracias. chickens... i sure would like to have some. still.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users