Jump to content


Photo

Corner Stores


  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1 YucatanStarTours

YucatanStarTours

    Super Advanced

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 499 posts

Posted 21 November 2013 - 02:49 AM

There are lots of little store in the Yucatan and at first site you might think they are pretty useless unless you want a back of chips or a soda. They do serve a very useful purpose in the community. They are distribution points for tortilla for one. Guys on motorcycles deliver them in coolers and restock throughout the day. That way everyone in the area can come and get fresh tortillas for the day. The stores are also handy for small amounts of things. For example the other day I needed one balloon for a project. A bag cost about 70 pesos in a big store. I was able to buy one balloon for 2 pesos in a little store. So helpful. These store do make money off taking larger amounts and making them into smaller amounts but this can be helpful as in my balloon shopping experience went. They also have been time tested and stock the most useful products for the community.

  So for all you that are planning on moving here, check out your corner stores and see what little candies they have or products that are helpful to have in a quick trip rather then going to a big store and waiting in line.





#2 Joanne

Joanne

    Veteran

  • Supporters
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,087 posts

Posted 21 November 2013 - 10:31 AM

Papelerias are great too.  When we first moved here we bought a pack of envelopes.  Used one and a month later when we needed another, they were all glued shut due to the humidity.  Better to just go buy one when you need it.


OASIS DEL MAR VACATION RENTALS
 

https://www.homeaway...-rental/p212447  Progreso


#3 CasiYucateco

CasiYucateco

    Veteran

  • Moderators
  • 3,308 posts

Posted 21 November 2013 - 10:41 AM

Here's a nice video about the tienditas (little stores).


{ Banner Free since 1978 }

#4 YolistoKhaki

YolistoKhaki

    Veteran

  • Administrators
  • 3,696 posts

Posted 21 November 2013 - 11:38 AM

The tienditas carry merchandise specific to the needs of their regular customers - so if you need something they don't have, don't hesitate to ask that they carry it for you.

 

My best friend owns a papeleria. One of her daughters threatened to quit school after 6th grade. They didn't argue with her - just told her that would be fine because they needed somebody full time (long hours 7 days a week) in the papeleria so she would have to take the job - go to school or work for her keep - her choice. She decided she would stay in school - lol



#5 amiv

amiv

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 116 posts

Posted 21 November 2013 - 01:25 PM

Good point, YucatanStarTours. I concentrate on the tiendita closest to me in Telchac Puerto, slowly building a "regular customer" relationship with them. I recently discovered that one person who works there is also an "Avon lady," so I ordered some stuff I don't exactly need for the same reason.They don't have everything there (no big bottles of water, for example), so I also shop at a few other tienditas to get to know some other people in town. I often buy fruit and veg from a small, permanent stand in the village. Now that I'm a regular there, they tell me when when they expect to have something out of the ordinary, like when the fresh pineapples are coming. I accidentally discovered a bakery in the village (long story), and what they make is at least as good as what's available at the Bodega's bakery in Progreso. I'm sure there are other such discoveries I have yet to make. And even if things are a tiny bit more expensive in the tienditas, I think it's good to make a point of buying from them because they serve the people who can't just jump in a car and go to a big store in town.



#6 doble

doble

    Veteran

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,779 posts

Posted 21 November 2013 - 02:24 PM

I have seen people purchasing one roll of toilet paper from a tiendita. Talk about "just in time" inventory management. :P



#7 iowahawkeye

iowahawkeye

    Veteran

  • Supporters
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,788 posts

Posted 22 November 2013 - 08:12 AM

It has been so humid here on occasions that a new roll of to left out overnight was a soggy mass of pulp in the morning. Reason for just in time inventory practices?


"facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence." John Adams

#8 Theresa

Theresa

    Expert

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 983 posts

Posted 22 November 2013 - 08:50 AM

I once bought a quarter cup of raisins from the tienda across the street. It doesn't make sense to stock up like it did NOB, cans rust, paper products degrade, and fruit rots faster here. I just view the neighborhood stores as a pantry  that I don't have to pay taxes on or pay CFE to keep my beverages cold. 

 

regards,

Theresa



#9 doble

doble

    Veteran

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,779 posts

Posted 22 November 2013 - 09:13 AM

It has been so humid here on occasions that a new roll of to left out overnight was a soggy mass of pulp in the morning. Reason for just in time inventory practices?

 

Hawkeye - you might have to improve your aim on your night time visits to the loo!!! :lol:  :D



#10 devonalberta

devonalberta

    Super Advanced

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 387 posts

Posted 22 November 2013 - 03:54 PM

Just wanted to say THANKS - we haven't even got down there yet and you have all enlightened me to no end!  I would not have known about tienda let alone look for one in Telchac but it has given me great incentive to purchase local (at least for the small stuff - still have to hit Costco when we first get there in Jan!) but seriously thanks!!!



#11 YucatanStarTours

YucatanStarTours

    Super Advanced

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 499 posts

Posted 23 November 2013 - 02:56 AM

  It is also nice to start a regular relationship with store owners and employees. Usually the same people work in these places for a long time. Even if your Spanish is bad, having someone know you are trying gives you the confidence to try a little harder each time you are there and people here are very acceptable to you not knowing much language.

  It is also good to know that a lot of people do not make more then $15-20 USD a day in these stores, if that. People are working hard in these jobs often with long hours and six days a week. I would often bring something by to share that I had made and it was always appreciated.

   Sometimes the math can be off at check out but this is not due to ripping you off but due to poor math skills. Usually there is a calculator there if there is no computer.



#12 CasiYucateco

CasiYucateco

    Veteran

  • Moderators
  • 3,308 posts

Posted 23 November 2013 - 12:17 PM

Sharing a little something with neighbors and tiendita owners is a great way to make yourself very welcome in the neighborhood.

Mexico runs on relationships and it's a huge help to have positive relationships with as many people as possible.


{ Banner Free since 1978 }

#13 R2RITO

R2RITO

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 40 posts

Posted 04 June 2014 - 08:32 AM

Here's a nice video about the tienditas (little stores).

 

Thank you for re-posting the first video i did for RLM.

 

Many things have change since i did the video. More local foreigners started buying in the Santiago area tienditas. 

Sadly one tiendita from the video has closed and the other two will probably close this year. The new government rules are making very difficult for tienditas to survive. 



#14 YolistoKhaki

YolistoKhaki

    Veteran

  • Administrators
  • 3,696 posts

Posted 04 June 2014 - 12:18 PM

we could tell them a thing or two about why not to do that here in the U.S. ... (sigh)...



#15 CasiYucateco

CasiYucateco

    Veteran

  • Moderators
  • 3,308 posts

Posted 04 June 2014 - 11:56 PM

Thank you for re-posting the first video i did for RLM.

Many things have change since i did the video. More local foreigners started buying in the Santiago area tienditas. 

Sadly one tiendita from the video has closed and the other two will probably close this year. The new government rules are making very difficult for tienditas to survive. 

 

 

R2RITO, could you tell us more about the new regulations? Is it tax rules? Or health rules? All of the above? We always go to the tienditas if they have something we need. They are closer and it builds good relationships with your neighbors. 


{ Banner Free since 1978 }

#16 ChuckD

ChuckD

    Trivia Hall of Famer

  • Supporters
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,115 posts

Posted 06 June 2014 - 08:55 AM

The government took away the Small Business Tax Plan. I forget the local term. It threatened to destroy small businesses under a tax and paperwork burden. All tax matters were being handled in DF. That has recently been reviewed and local taxation returned to the states. There are still many uncertainties though.

OASIS DEL MAR VACATION RENTALS
https://www.homeaway...-rental/p212447 Progreso
 


#17 JeffKontur

JeffKontur

    Lurker

  • Members
  • 4 posts

Posted 23 February 2016 - 03:52 PM

Great stuff in this thread! We try to frequent small shops (perhaps the closest US equivalent to the tiendas), especially for produce. I particularly loved the idea of treating them like a neighborhood pantry. Brilliant.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users