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Interpreters?

Interpreter language English Spanish

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#1 lencho

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Posted 08 August 2015 - 02:21 PM

Hey, y'all--

Dealing with Spanish is a detail for many expats and I'm curious whether any of us here have actually used a trained English-Spanish interpreter for things like doctor's visits or other specialized situations. Are there even any available in Mérida?



#2 ChuckD

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Posted 08 August 2015 - 05:06 PM

There are several that I know of in Merida. I've never used one though

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#3 judy

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 06:54 AM

David at Speak and Spell, in Progreso, helped Jeff and I with a complicated doctor's visit. I was a student of his so he did it as a friend, but I believe he will also accept clients who need a translator.



#4 lencho

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Posted 10 August 2015 - 12:03 AM

David at Speak and Spell, in Progreso, helped Jeff and I with a complicated doctor's visit. I was a student of his so he did it as a friend, but I believe he will also accept clients who need a translator.


Thanks. I'm not seeking one, but was curious how folks have been dealing with that detail. I assume most doctors speak at least some English, but maybe not other staff in a clinic; not having to struggle with communication would sure reduce stress and increase options in a lot of situations, not just medical...



#5 CasiYucateco

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Posted 10 August 2015 - 12:44 AM

There are plenty of attorneys and others who are skilled translators. Most expats have a friend or neighbor who speaks Spanish and English both and there are expats who are known for being helpful in emergency situations. There are expat services like YES and others.

But, also, many doctors and nurses speak at least some English, which is a common & popular college class. English is taught even in many grade schools. I've had 8 year olds come up to me and say a few words in conversational English.  One 18 yo originating from a tiny pueblo over an hour from Merida surprised me when he said "Thank you!" with a huge smile in unaccented English when I brought big jugs of water and ice chests to their work site. A lot of college kids want to practice their English with a foreigner.

But speaking Spanish and learned at least the basics is still highly recommended. While English may frequently or surprisingly be encountered, Spanish is the way to go if you really want to understand what's going on all around you.
 


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#6 lencho

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Posted 10 August 2015 - 02:57 PM

But speaking Spanish and learned at least the basics is still highly recommended. While English may frequently or surprisingly be encountered, Spanish is the way to go if you really want to understand what's going on all around you.


Not to just understand, but to reduce objectification of oneself as a Gringo, to be able to throw out the heartstrings without banging into that huge barrier of linguistic disharmony.



#7 judy

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Posted 11 August 2015 - 04:38 AM

I found this in the way back machine and thought it might be helpful.

I met this woman in my surgeon's office at Star Medico about 3 years ago. She was assisting a woman from Belize with all her medical needs.

She not only brought the woman and her husband to all appointments, sat in and interpreted, but also picked the couple up at the bus station when they arrived from Belize and found them a place to stay. I wrote this up at the time for the Beach Gals newsletter.

Not sure if she is still here, but at the time she told me she had a lot of clients.

 

Assistance with medical services

Teresita Matos is a medical services social worker based in Merida.  She is fluent in Spanish and English, and has worked for people both North and South of the boarders of Mexico with all issues concerning medical services.

I met Teresita in my surgeon’s office in Merida while she was assisting a client from Belize. The client was not fluent in Spanish. Teresita had met the woman and her husband at the bus station, helped them with housing, and was now driving them to appointments and interpreting for them. The couple had used Teresita several times before, and were very pleased with her level of service.

She is well educated with medical procedures, and the way in which Mexico’s medical system works, as well as having a relationship with many doctors in the area.

If you are unsure of your ability to navigate through what can be a complicated process on your own, Teresita may be of help. It is always a good idea to have someone with you when seeing a doctor that is not fluent in your language. If you are admitted into a hospital, family members are invaluable, but it sometimes helps to have someone advocating for you who understands the process, and can devote themselves to your needs.

Contact information: Teresita Matos, cell: 9999 600543, home: 945 1769



#8 WilliamLawson

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Posted 29 June 2016 - 07:36 PM

Not to just understand, but to reduce objectification of oneself as a Gringo, to be able to throw out the heartstrings without banging into that huge barrier of linguistic disharmony.


This is great! I recently found myself in Brazil (how I got there I have no idea) and ran into this very problem So much I wanted to express and was unable to - extremely frustrating speaking like bloody Tarzan.





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